Category Archives: lose pounds

Michael L. Love: Flavonoid blast fudge recipe

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Work on the fudge recipe continues.  Although I have been very busy with other things, I could not resist sharing my latest recipe idea.  Last weekend when I was causing my Memorial Day ruckus and getting my Twitter account temporarily suspended, I was enjoying elderberry fudge.

As some of you probably know, elderberry is the queen of the berries with respect to flavonoid content, and Vitacost offers some fine elderberry extracts in order to maximize the flavonoid content.  With elderberry combined with cocoa, this fudge is a literal flavonoid blast!

I must apologize that this recipe is still experimental, and I am having a hard time getting exact portion measurements, so you might have to adjust the ratio of elderberry extract to cocoa powder in order to get the desired consistency.  It should also be noted that this preparation is likely easily adapted as healthful and delicious cocoa/berry spread and syrup.  In fact, this preparation is so beneficial and tasty that I thought it imperative to share the recipe, even though it is still somewhat unfinished.

The key idea was to substitute elderberry extract for the agave nectar from the previous fudge recipe.  Unlike the agave nectar, elderberry extract has concentrated astringent solutes, so that it is necessary to add quite abit more extract than agave nectar in order to match the moisture content.  In my judgement this also made the fudge much more sticky, and so I have adjusted the recipe and preparation in order to address this problem and reduce the preparation time. 

Before proceeding with the recipe, it should also be noted that the elderberry extract is far more expensive than agave nectar, so it is likely that this recipe is more for special occasions.  Here is the recipe for two portions.

2 heaping tablespoons cocoa powder
4 tablespoons elderberry extract
1/2 teaspoon low lignan flax or olive oil

Mix ingredients and/or knead until the desired consistency is obtained.  It may be necessary to add more cocoa or extract in order to obtain the desired result.  If you scale up, use a food processor and save yourself much work.  You might obtain soft granules that look a little like coffee grounds, which works pretty well. Press the fudge into suitable containers and cut into squares.

If you are using highly concentrated extract, then it might be necessary to sweeten with a teaspoon of agave nectar.  Substitution of other fruit concentrates, such as cranberry, pomegranate, blueberry, or cherry will likely work as well, although the flavonoid content will be somewhat lower.  The oil reduces the stickiness and makes the fudge easier to handle, but it also likely improves the absorption of the flavonoids vastly.  In my subjective experience, this recipe is comparable to parsley in terms of the flavonoid impact.  Please enjoy this delicious fudge, and the intended health benefits as well!  Write in and let me know what you think of it.

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Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org

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    Posted Friday, Jun 4, 2010 2:13 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: parsley as a preservative


    Michael L. Love: Good morning world
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    It is still a marvel to me that I have not yet been able to uncover any ancient lore regarding parsley.  Given its properties, one would expect it to be the stuff of legend.  For example, while maintaining myself on the parsley plan described in this blog, this has been my best allergy season for years, as anticipated.  More about this later.  Another thing I noticed lately is that parsley is a great preservative, which now should come as no surprise either.  Parsley is simply loaded with astringent phenolics, such as apigenin, which are excellent preservatives, in addition to being extraordinarily healthful.

    Some of you may know that I bring a zippy bag full of veges with me most times.  This bag of tricks typically contains a red pepper, a carrot, black grapes, parsley sprigs, sometimes grapefruit sections, and whatever other vegetables I happen to have around the house.  I also eat a bit of cheese, which I keep separate from the vegetables, but a little cross-contamination is inevitable, which has sometimes led to some surprisingly tasty results.  Unfortunately, it has also sometimes led to vegetable spoilage, even though I keep the bag in the fridge overnight.  Lately, I have also been adding about 1/4 cup of parsley flakes, and it has clearly been inhibiting the growth of micro-organisms and the resulting food spoilage. 

    One supposes that citrus stored buried in parsley flakes would suffer far less mold.  Cheese coated with parsley flakes would also likely store better, and many other excellent benefits are expected.  It is difficult to believe that the ancients were unaware of these important properties of parsley.  They were able to surmise the healthful benefits of many plants and spices based upon their preservative properties.  If anyone discovers some genuine parsley lore, I would definitely be interested in hearing about it.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

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    Published Friday, May 07, 2010 09:06 AM by proclus

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    proclus : Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues

    Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
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    I don’t know if I am the first person to eat a cup of parsley flakes every day.  I doubt it, but there are not many reports.  It is definitely a learning experience.  For example, my eyes are a little dry, certainly due the CFTR inhibition by apigenin.  It is only a little bothersome, and not severe.  I have never had dry eyes in my life, and it is an interesting experience.  I don’t plan to resort to an eye wash.  I may reduce my dose somewhat, but not yet, I am having too much fun.

    As noted below, this program easily puts gram levels of flavonoids into your body, and as a plus, you will enjoy the marvellous parsley flavor as never before.  Due to the high flavonoid content, there is a possible increased likelihood of intestinal blockage with prolonged use, again because of the CFTR blockade.  If you are like me, you will merely experience more regularity, but as noted before, those who might have intestinal problems, such as cryptitis, should probably not use this much parsley. 

    It is remarkable how widespread the effects of CFTR blockade are in the body.  My heartburn is much diminished since starting the parsley regimen, which would also be a consistent effect, since CFTR function is a key component of acid secretion in the stomach, as well as acid quenching in the duodenum.  In fact, this is a key reason why cystic fibrosis patients require special diets, and enzyme supplementation.  I would suspect that this is one reason why enzymes are so popular in the supplement community.

    Another thing that I am noticing is a prolonged and enhanced effect of dextromorphan.  This is confirmational of the finding that apigenin, like several other flavoniods, inhibits a p450 enzyme that is involved in dextromorphan metabolism, among several other drugs.  A reduced dose may be indicated, and I will be getting my scheduled liver and kidney tests promptly.  My experience is that this enhanced effect is profound, and my coughing symptoms have improved vastly.  It should be noted at this point that this much parsley is quite diuretic as well. 

    These effects are not limited to parsley or apigenin, and there are quite a few polyphenols that are capable of producing a CFTR blockade, notably resveratrol.  If you get very far above gram level dosing, you are also likely to experience similar effects with quercetin.  The same is true for the p450 inhibition.

    I am learning more about the parsley plant.  For example, the root and seeds have much more of the other interesting parsley molecule, apiol, also known as parsley extract, parsley oil, or parsley camphor.  There is much to say about apiol, but I will only give it a cursory treatment.  There is much information about this molecule elsewhere on the web.  The apiol extract is an anciently known preparation with many uses, including regularization of menstruation and an abortitive property.  It is also somewhat dangerous, and there are even reported fatalities from ingesting too much apiol.  Perhaps some young women, eager to restore their menstruation, unfortunately abused this chemical in the camphor form.

    Apiol can have other unhealthful effects, and it has even been demonstrated to form DNA adducts, due to its extended reactive end-group.  This is a commonplace problem associated with the 1-allyl side chain, which is found in many flavonoid producing plants.  Unlike some other compounds, apiol forms weak adducts, which are apparently easily rectified in the cell, and there is much less apiol in the leaves, which is unlikely to present a problem.

    I would be interested in hearing if any women are experiencing regularization of menstruation while on this parsley regimen.  The effect may be small to nil, due to the comparitively low apiol content of the parsley flakes.

    Well, this turned out to be rather exhuastive after all.  Cheers!

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    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

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    Published Monday, January 25, 2010 08:42 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters

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    Diarrhea is a frequently problem for those who undertake supplementation and vegetarian-style regimens.  On the other hand, what for some of us is a minor inconvenience or annoyance can become life-threatening in some parts of the world where there are complicating issues.  It is a real problem, which is larger than some of us think, and the dehydration resulting from diarrhea may be dangerous for those who are using supplements as well.  First advice is drink plenty of water if you are using supplements.  It should be noted that water shock can be fatal in severe cases.

    As it happens, certain flavonoids have been documented to have a paradoxical anti-diarrhea property when taken in large doses.  This is due to inhibition of the ATP-cAMP-dependent chloride channel (CFTR), and these flavonoids have been suggested as a remedy in cases where diarrhea might become dangerous.  Parsley flavonoid shares in the ability to block this channel and slow digestion, so that water can be absorbed from the intestine.

    Fortunately, parsley is a widely available commodity, even in some of the poorest of countries.   I am recommending that an anti-diarrhea emulsion could include enough parsley to help save lives.  It has been demonstrated that such inexpensive preparations can do great good.  It can be flavored with a little sweetener for small children.  Diarrhea can take its toll, particularly on the young, hopefully this information will help to prevent the death of some little ones.

    Interestingly, the cystic fibrosis disease results from a defect in this same chloride channel.  The wide range of symptoms indicate how widespread this channel is in the body, including the nasal passages and lungs.  Those suffering from intestinal maladies, such as cryptitis, should consider avoiding such things as quercetin and parsley flakes.  There is some evidence that we can find alternative flavonoid regimens for them, which do not inhibit the channel.   I am including below a salient reference.

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    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Cocoa-related flavonoids inhibit CFTR-mediated chloride transport across T84 human colon epithelia

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    Published Monday, January 18, 2010 08:36 PM by proclus