Category Archives: fitness

Some notes about #Iron and #Fitness. – #fitness #running #biking #iron #lifespan #aerobic #nutrition #exercise #prepping #longevity #health #food #carfree #run #polyphenols #flavonoids

High RBC counts should help with the retention of iron.

NIH:Study shows iron supplementation after blood donation shortens hemoglobin recovery time http://1.usa.gov/1Ah75iV

I recommend stopping iron supplementation after the suggested number of weeks. People who give blood regularly will likely know if they are in the low or high iron group.

Did great on the hills, so probably right about blood donation, etc. I think the added capacity means more iron free hemoglobin sites available.  It would be great to have supplementation guidelines for well-conditioned athetes, so that they don’t overshoot. Too iron much is bad. It’s also likely best to leave a surplus of iron free hemoglobin sites, to clear free iron after RBC turnover.

Given all those caveats, well-conditioned athletes likely have sufficient excess heme to benefit greatly from additional iron. The possibility of providing for additional oxygen transport is very alluring. I can’t rule out the possibility that the two iron pills also helped on the hills. If you don’t believe 2 pills could help, then crunch the numbers. You will see for yourself.

I see some evidence of over-ingestion of in the athletic community. This is bad folks. Please avoid. Those studying exercise cardiomyopathy should check for over-ingestion of iron, etc. As a reminder, too much iron is problematic. The NIH used a low dose. 

Here is another link to the NIH blood supplementation article
http://1.usa.gov/1Ah75iV

Along with the caveat, I’m also grateful that iron supplements are readily available to anyone, without a prescription. The human body does all the marvelous iron chemistry w/ 4.2 grams of the stuff total.  It is likely that microgram levels of iron supplementation could have a large effect over the course of time. To put this in perspective, the body has a more than a full kilogram of calcium. Unlike iron, calcium has relatively low toxicity

I strongly recommend the cast iron griddles to protect your supply. Don’t overcook on the iron griddles tho. That’s another big problem! Google has a list of iron food sources. It’s possible to get alot from the food without eating much meat. http://bit.ly/1Afu93e

If you go easy on the meat, you have even more reason to go easy on the liver. If blood leaks into the space around the muscles,& breaks down, it releases free iron. This free iron could perpetuated any problems with free radicals, perhaps giving rise to a burning sensation in the gap areas. Be cautious about iron, etc, but make good use of it. Maintaining a high level of conditioning is another good iron strategy. Rich blood hoards more iron. It could speed you on your way and put some air under your feet ;-).

I have other strategies for improving oxygen transport. Be sure and check out my articles about winter training and cold adaptation. 

Winter bicycling may have some major #health benefits. – Cold temperatures, strength, and aerobic capacity #biking 

http://bit.ly/1gMlnON 

Let’s bone up for winter. – #fitness #running #biking #exercise #nutrition #carfree #lifespan #fasting #longevity #food #training

http://proclus.tumblr.com/post/103683212002/lets-bone-up-for-winter-fitness-running

Cut your #BP card. BP Oil Spill #boycottbp

Cut your #BP card. BP Oil Spill #boycottbp

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http://proclus-gnu-darwin.posterous.com/ Facebook allergies antiwar bicycle bp fitness oilspill turtles autism health whales

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GNU-Darwin supports the BP boycott BP aging antiwar asd bicycle bike black boycottbp cancer diet fitness flavonoids food foss gulf health oilspill pain parsley recipes tagmaker http://ping.fm/eSRXB

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Michael L. Love: Please consider following @Public_Citizen. They truly rock! aging diet cancer fitness food health

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Michael L. Love: Without your health, you have nothing. aging diet cancer fitness food health link -> http://ping.fm/f0rDc

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proclus : Michael L. Love: Without your health, you have nothing#aging diet cancer fitness food health http://ping.fm/f0rDc

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NIH should fund free access to medical journals health diet fitness science http://ping.fm/Sfbne

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proclus : Michael L. Love: Without your health, you have nothing aging diet cancer fitness food http://ping.fm/Yobt1

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proclus : Michael L. Love: Without your health, you have nothing aging diet cancer fitness food health http://ping.fm/W4OC3

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Michael L. Love: Thai Black Rice update – proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous calories, diets, fitness http://ping.fm/5f4B1

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proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous boycottbp oilspill BP diet health nutrition food fitness seafood antioxidant http://ping.fm/YYGO0

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proclus: Sell your car. Buy a bicycle. Do it now. http://ping.fm/uFz3z http://ping.fm/dOKj8 boycottbp oilspill BP diet health nutrition food fitness seafood antioxidant http://ping.fm/KPDZC

Michael L. Love: Seafood notes

I grabbed the following information from my Amazon Seafood Wishlist, because I thought that it deserved more visibiltiy.

The healthful benefits of seafood are widely noted.  I am searching for seafood which is low in mercury, high in DHA, and high in astaxanthin, and found that red salmon fills the bill.

DHA is one of the beneficial unsaturated omega 3 fatty acids, which is already widely known for its healthful benefits, and sure to be rising in prominence as well.  Caviar is probably one of the best sources of DHA, far and away, and the red variety is also likely rich in astaxanthin, while the black variety is rich in melanin compounds, which are also likely to be healthful.  One must be wary however of the food colorings that are used to produce the color in less expensive caviar.  Due caution, and more information is needed.  I have written an Amazon Guide about this.  I am looking for inexpensive caviar that is also low in food coloring.  See the wishlist for some examples.  There are additional notes about some of the inexpensive caviars in the images section.  I am projecting that the simple unprocessed salmon roe will be the best.  

Astaxanthin is a carotene-like nutrient that is only available from red fish and certain shell fishes, such as shrimp.  I have been told that shrimp are fed to fish in order to deepen their beneficial redness.

Sodium salt is a problem with seafood, but the benefits probably outweigh this problem, especially if you eliminate salt from other parts of your diet.  Sodium is a particular problem for caviar, and it is probably unwise to eat unrinsed caviar.  Better than rinsing, desalt the caviar.  The eggs desalt rapidly because of their small size, and it improves the taste considerably.  Don't use too much water though, because it will leach out the DHA.  Just add enough water to cover over the eggs, stir gently to break up the clumps, let stand for a few minutes, then drain and rinse.  Enjoy your caviar and salmon!

One more thing for Weight Loss Vitacosters, I have found that substituting red salmon and citrus fruits for calorie dense foods has reduced my hunger pangs considerably.  Clearly, the salmon can be expected to be very satisfying.  I have lost several pounds as a result of this change.  I restrict the salmon to a heaping tablespoonful per meal, twice per day, which still provides a substantial amount of the mentioned nutrients.

Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz

    Posted Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009 1:01 PM by proclus

    Michael L. Love: Thai Black Rice update

    I thought that the Vitacost community might be interested in the latest snippet from the Molecules site news, featuring Vitacost and this blog.

    For those who are following the activism aspect of the Molecules site, I thought that you might be interested in a little pre-history as it were. Prior to the founding of the Molecules site, the activism first hatched under the GNU-Darwin umbrella, and the fundamental idea of molecules activism was invented. Initially, it was concerned primarily with resveratrol and other caloric restriction memetics, but it was clearly bound to expand from there. You can read some of the early material in the GNU-Darwin Posts regarding resveratrol and calorie restriction. As was previously mentioned, the ideas were formally developed in the FOSS, Science, and Public activism essay, and it was even put forth as a war protest in the so-called bootstrapping essay. As the Molecules site developed, it became clear that additional adjunct activities were required in order to push the activism harder. One of these adjuncts was created on the Vitacost website, where it is easy to provide directed links to crucial molecules for those who want to obtain them for themselves. Moreover, the activism ideas continue to evolve there in blog format. Check it out: Michael L. Love proclus Blog on Vitacost.

    Tonight I found some very satisfying news related to all of this. One of the last few GNU-Darwin posts regarding resveratrol and caloric restriction referred to the very high anthocyanin content of the forbidden Thai black rice. You can read about that in the link above. At the time that I wrote the post there was virtually no product development around the black rice, but now I am happy to learn that there are many such products. Several can be found on the Vitacost website. Obviously, I cannot take any credit for this marvellous development, but the success is consistent with the activism ideas that I have been developing. There are many examples of such successes, some of them are documented in a free software activism article that I wrote several years ago. The implications are pretty far reaching. For more examples, check out this page on GNU-Darwin, or the links page and personal page of this blog. We also should consider the possibility that thinking in similar veins together makes great minds out of us. Of course the internet itself seems pre-designed for that sort of activism. Cheers!

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz

    Posted Monday, Dec 28, 2009 9:28 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: writing and riding

    Michael L. Love: writing and riding
    I have been busy writing. Some of it may appear here eventually. It is unclear to me that community members are interested in broader personal information, other than that which is focused on one of the four main interest categories. And I am inclined at this time to put such information elsewhere. Such is the case with the article I wrote today.

    Google, user interests, and biasing factors
    http://proclus.gnu-darwin.org/google-bias.html

    Data from the community blog post tables assisted my conclusions. That is how I spent my morning. There is more in the pipe, such as some autobiographical information. I am currently thinking that community members are less interested in topics that do not fall strictly under the four goal/interest categories. Which is the main reason I have been posting such material elsewhere. I think that this article is germane to anyone who wants to promote their blog, which many in the community might find helpful. It is like the code I developed for blog extraction, and I am posting to all four groups because of this fact.

    I split my bicycle rim this week, and I will likely spend the afternoon spoking it out. This problem is due to the magnesium, which is much softer than conventional bicycle materials. Other bicycles would be less expensive, more reliable, and stronger, as I describe in the winter bicycling articles. This is the disadvantage of riding in style, but I think that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. The light weight and attention-getting appearance are the main advantages of this ultra-light bicycle. The crucial action is that people see the bicyclist. In addition to promoting the sport, it is good for the continued health and well being of the rider, as well as the writer.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: blogging, facebook, and Radical Mormon
  • Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus
  • Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe
  • Michael L. Love: parsley recipe alert!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and bone loss
  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz

    Published Saturday, February 27, 2010 02:27 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/27/1203.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Michael L. Love: healthful easy fudge recipe

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    As has been noted previously in this blog, cocoa flavonoids share in the healthful benefits of other noted flavonoids, such as citrus bioflavonoids and parsley apigenin.  In fact, 70% dark chocolate has been widely recommended because of the demonstrated health benefit.

    I had suspected that most of the phenolics and other beneficial anti-oxidants were bound to the fiber in the cocoa solids, and like many other foods, such as grain and citrus, this turns out to be the case.  It is unfortunate that these beneficial substances have sometimes been set aside in the past, but thankfully, that is changing.  In the case of cocoa, this tends to be less of a problem, because the delicious chocolate flavor resides in the solid fraction, from which cocoa powder is made.  There is, however, some cause for concern, because harsh processing is often used to improve the flavor, and it is likely that much nutrient loss results from these processes.  This is why I favor plain, inexpensive, commonplace cocoa powder.  One of the reasons it is less expensive is that it has received less processing.  It should be noted that it is not too hard to find a whole pound of cocoa powder for the price of a single 70% dark chocolate bar, and the powder is likely just as beneficial.  You can even improve the healthfulness by adding more cocoa than is found in the chocolate bar without sacrificing flavor, as I explain below.

    I say, beware of chocolate that is too delicious, because you might be losing some of the benefit.  Similar to the problem of chocolate processing, the glycemic sweeteners that are used to improve the flavor can also detract from the healthful benefit, and the cocoa butter, though beneficial, is likely far less healthful than the cocoa powder.  In order to address these problems in this fudge recipe, no cocoa butter is used. That means using cocoa powder instead of chocolate.  Although it is not sugar free, agave nectar is non-glycemic, and it has been demonstrated to be healthful when used in moderation.  This is due in part to the fact that agave nectar is much sweeter than table sugar so that less is used.  Agave nectar also happens to make a very tasty suspension of the cocoa particles, fudge.  To me the taste is comparable to some more expensive 70% dark chocolates, and it is also likely just as beneficially healthful.  In fact, it is a delicious chocolate treat that can easily be adapted as a spreadable dessert topping.  If you are like me, you may have some difficulty maintaining the crucial portion restriction, because of that great old irresistible chocolate flavor.  Even with the healthful adaptations, it is still a classic.

    It is interesting to muse that our lust for chocolate derives directly from the fact that the polyphenolic and anti-oxidant power resides in the solid fraction, which preserves extremely well.  These phenolic and phenyamine molecules surely contribute to the neuroactivity of chocolate. These factors also likely explain the marvelous shelf life of cocoa butter, although it has far less of them.  It is truly an unusual case, and our taste for some other flavonoid-laden foods is apparently far less evolved.  Chocolate is wildly popular in many countries across the globe, and if it is well prepared, it is a very healthful food that kids love.  For those on diets, I have found that a regular helping of cocoa reduces cravings considerably, so that it can aid weight loss if portion restrictions are obeyed.  At any rate, on to the recipe.  It is very simple, easy, and inexpensive to make.  By my measure, it is about 80% cocoa, but you would not know it by the taste, because the agave nectar is very sweet. It is a chocolatey powerhouse!

    Makes 1 serving:
    2 heaping tbsp cocoa powder
    1 tbsp agave nectar

    optional:
    1 heaping tbsp peanut butter (I like chunky for the texture.)
    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    Carefully mix the ingredients until a dark, uniform mixture is achieved.  As anyone who works with cocoa powder will tell you, it will require a good amount of careful mixing to avoid waste and achieve a uniform mixture, but it is well worth the effort. ;-}  I have to say it is so delicious that I have never allowed it to set up very well, but I have some friends with more experience who assure me that it will, especially with the peanut butter added.  Without the cocoa butter and sugar, it may not have a classic fudge consistency, but for the additional healthful benefit, it is likely well worth this small sacrifice.  Trust me, sucrose molecules are worth avoiding.  Although I am changing over from chocolate to this recipe, I consider it to be still somewhat experimental, and I may post further adaptations here.  Feel free to suggest something, and we can discuss it.  For example, I find that without the peanut butter, it makes a delicious coating for a serving of nuts.

    In summary, this fudge delivers that classic taste, very much like good 70% dark chocolate, and it also provides even more of the healthful cocoa, with much less glycemic load, at far less monetary cost.  I think we have a winner here, but please remember to mind your portion restriction.  Too much of this stuff might destroy the benefit.

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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org

    The blog

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  • Why does any body want to live forever?
  • Michael L. Love/proclus/GNU-Darwin link block
  • Michael L. Love: addressing backlash pain
  • Michael L. Love: blog rss feed
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and autism
  • Michael L. Love: Sharing your blog
  • Michael L. Love Love's Japan
  • Michael L. Love: parsley brownie
  • Michael L. Love: My brother's blog: Certain Conditions
  • Michael L. Love: Thank you SourceForge and many others too!
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    Posted Sunday, Apr 25, 2010 4:17 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals

    Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
    Some of you might be interested in molecules that chemists use to form stable free radicals.  It is remarkable how similar in structure some of them are to polyphenols, which probably helps to explain some of their properties.  I would suspect that this kind of work underpins much of the supplementation that we do today.  Chemistry is not my specialty, but I found this small collection to be very interesting, and probably valuable to someone.

    free radical Molecules Structural Archive and Gallery

    More interesting gallaries are in the pipeline.  If you want to watch them as they roll out, subscribe by rss.

    http://molecules.gnu-darwin.org/mod.rss

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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe
  • Michael L. Love: parsley recipe alert!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and bone loss
  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz

    Published Thursday, January 14, 2010 04:54 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/25/1052.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    proclus : Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus, more parsley caveats

    Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus
    Now that I have been high dosing flavonoids for a few weeks, I think that it may be time for another change.  My stomach acid and digestion have apparently returned to what they were before I started,

    Read more at the Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/22/1167.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/