Category Archives: diets

Michael L. Love: Flavonoid blast fudge recipe

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Work on the fudge recipe continues.  Although I have been very busy with other things, I could not resist sharing my latest recipe idea.  Last weekend when I was causing my Memorial Day ruckus and getting my Twitter account temporarily suspended, I was enjoying elderberry fudge.

As some of you probably know, elderberry is the queen of the berries with respect to flavonoid content, and Vitacost offers some fine elderberry extracts in order to maximize the flavonoid content.  With elderberry combined with cocoa, this fudge is a literal flavonoid blast!

I must apologize that this recipe is still experimental, and I am having a hard time getting exact portion measurements, so you might have to adjust the ratio of elderberry extract to cocoa powder in order to get the desired consistency.  It should also be noted that this preparation is likely easily adapted as healthful and delicious cocoa/berry spread and syrup.  In fact, this preparation is so beneficial and tasty that I thought it imperative to share the recipe, even though it is still somewhat unfinished.

The key idea was to substitute elderberry extract for the agave nectar from the previous fudge recipe.  Unlike the agave nectar, elderberry extract has concentrated astringent solutes, so that it is necessary to add quite abit more extract than agave nectar in order to match the moisture content.  In my judgement this also made the fudge much more sticky, and so I have adjusted the recipe and preparation in order to address this problem and reduce the preparation time. 

Before proceeding with the recipe, it should also be noted that the elderberry extract is far more expensive than agave nectar, so it is likely that this recipe is more for special occasions.  Here is the recipe for two portions.

2 heaping tablespoons cocoa powder
4 tablespoons elderberry extract
1/2 teaspoon low lignan flax or olive oil

Mix ingredients and/or knead until the desired consistency is obtained.  It may be necessary to add more cocoa or extract in order to obtain the desired result.  If you scale up, use a food processor and save yourself much work.  You might obtain soft granules that look a little like coffee grounds, which works pretty well. Press the fudge into suitable containers and cut into squares.

If you are using highly concentrated extract, then it might be necessary to sweeten with a teaspoon of agave nectar.  Substitution of other fruit concentrates, such as cranberry, pomegranate, blueberry, or cherry will likely work as well, although the flavonoid content will be somewhat lower.  The oil reduces the stickiness and makes the fudge easier to handle, but it also likely improves the absorption of the flavonoids vastly.  In my subjective experience, this recipe is comparable to parsley in terms of the flavonoid impact.  Please enjoy this delicious fudge, and the intended health benefits as well!  Write in and let me know what you think of it.

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Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org

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    Posted Friday, Jun 4, 2010 2:13 PM by proclus

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    Michael L. Love: Thai Black Rice update – proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous calories, diets, fitness http://ping.fm/5f4B1

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    Michael L. Love: Seafood notes

    I grabbed the following information from my Amazon Seafood Wishlist, because I thought that it deserved more visibiltiy.

    The healthful benefits of seafood are widely noted.  I am searching for seafood which is low in mercury, high in DHA, and high in astaxanthin, and found that red salmon fills the bill.

    DHA is one of the beneficial unsaturated omega 3 fatty acids, which is already widely known for its healthful benefits, and sure to be rising in prominence as well.  Caviar is probably one of the best sources of DHA, far and away, and the red variety is also likely rich in astaxanthin, while the black variety is rich in melanin compounds, which are also likely to be healthful.  One must be wary however of the food colorings that are used to produce the color in less expensive caviar.  Due caution, and more information is needed.  I have written an Amazon Guide about this.  I am looking for inexpensive caviar that is also low in food coloring.  See the wishlist for some examples.  There are additional notes about some of the inexpensive caviars in the images section.  I am projecting that the simple unprocessed salmon roe will be the best.  

    Astaxanthin is a carotene-like nutrient that is only available from red fish and certain shell fishes, such as shrimp.  I have been told that shrimp are fed to fish in order to deepen their beneficial redness.

    Sodium salt is a problem with seafood, but the benefits probably outweigh this problem, especially if you eliminate salt from other parts of your diet.  Sodium is a particular problem for caviar, and it is probably unwise to eat unrinsed caviar.  Better than rinsing, desalt the caviar.  The eggs desalt rapidly because of their small size, and it improves the taste considerably.  Don't use too much water though, because it will leach out the DHA.  Just add enough water to cover over the eggs, stir gently to break up the clumps, let stand for a few minutes, then drain and rinse.  Enjoy your caviar and salmon!

    One more thing for Weight Loss Vitacosters, I have found that substituting red salmon and citrus fruits for calorie dense foods has reduced my hunger pangs considerably.  Clearly, the salmon can be expected to be very satisfying.  I have lost several pounds as a result of this change.  I restrict the salmon to a heaping tablespoonful per meal, twice per day, which still provides a substantial amount of the mentioned nutrients.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
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    Posted Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009 1:01 PM by proclus

    Michael L. Love: Thai Black Rice update

    I thought that the Vitacost community might be interested in the latest snippet from the Molecules site news, featuring Vitacost and this blog.

    For those who are following the activism aspect of the Molecules site, I thought that you might be interested in a little pre-history as it were. Prior to the founding of the Molecules site, the activism first hatched under the GNU-Darwin umbrella, and the fundamental idea of molecules activism was invented. Initially, it was concerned primarily with resveratrol and other caloric restriction memetics, but it was clearly bound to expand from there. You can read some of the early material in the GNU-Darwin Posts regarding resveratrol and calorie restriction. As was previously mentioned, the ideas were formally developed in the FOSS, Science, and Public activism essay, and it was even put forth as a war protest in the so-called bootstrapping essay. As the Molecules site developed, it became clear that additional adjunct activities were required in order to push the activism harder. One of these adjuncts was created on the Vitacost website, where it is easy to provide directed links to crucial molecules for those who want to obtain them for themselves. Moreover, the activism ideas continue to evolve there in blog format. Check it out: Michael L. Love proclus Blog on Vitacost.

    Tonight I found some very satisfying news related to all of this. One of the last few GNU-Darwin posts regarding resveratrol and caloric restriction referred to the very high anthocyanin content of the forbidden Thai black rice. You can read about that in the link above. At the time that I wrote the post there was virtually no product development around the black rice, but now I am happy to learn that there are many such products. Several can be found on the Vitacost website. Obviously, I cannot take any credit for this marvellous development, but the success is consistent with the activism ideas that I have been developing. There are many examples of such successes, some of them are documented in a free software activism article that I wrote several years ago. The implications are pretty far reaching. For more examples, check out this page on GNU-Darwin, or the links page and personal page of this blog. We also should consider the possibility that thinking in similar veins together makes great minds out of us. Of course the internet itself seems pre-designed for that sort of activism. Cheers!

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
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    Posted Monday, Dec 28, 2009 9:28 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: parsley as a preservative


    Michael L. Love: Good morning world
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    It is still a marvel to me that I have not yet been able to uncover any ancient lore regarding parsley.  Given its properties, one would expect it to be the stuff of legend.  For example, while maintaining myself on the parsley plan described in this blog, this has been my best allergy season for years, as anticipated.  More about this later.  Another thing I noticed lately is that parsley is a great preservative, which now should come as no surprise either.  Parsley is simply loaded with astringent phenolics, such as apigenin, which are excellent preservatives, in addition to being extraordinarily healthful.

    Some of you may know that I bring a zippy bag full of veges with me most times.  This bag of tricks typically contains a red pepper, a carrot, black grapes, parsley sprigs, sometimes grapefruit sections, and whatever other vegetables I happen to have around the house.  I also eat a bit of cheese, which I keep separate from the vegetables, but a little cross-contamination is inevitable, which has sometimes led to some surprisingly tasty results.  Unfortunately, it has also sometimes led to vegetable spoilage, even though I keep the bag in the fridge overnight.  Lately, I have also been adding about 1/4 cup of parsley flakes, and it has clearly been inhibiting the growth of micro-organisms and the resulting food spoilage. 

    One supposes that citrus stored buried in parsley flakes would suffer far less mold.  Cheese coated with parsley flakes would also likely store better, and many other excellent benefits are expected.  It is difficult to believe that the ancients were unaware of these important properties of parsley.  They were able to surmise the healthful benefits of many plants and spices based upon their preservative properties.  If anyone discovers some genuine parsley lore, I would definitely be interested in hearing about it.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

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  • Michael L. Love: at work
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    Published Friday, May 07, 2010 09:06 AM by proclus

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    proclus : Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey

    Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
    I am following up with research on some of the foods on the list, particularly the ones that I am less familiar with. So I started with rutabagas, and this humble vegetable is taking far longer to research than I expected, which mostly explains why I haven’t posted recently. There is rapeseed oil, canola, Monsanto, turnip greens, and much much more; each with research forks. It is really a marvellous subject, and there will likely be more in the future about this, but that is unfortunately all that I can say for now. I’ll leave you with one of the more interesting references that I turned up, related to autism and iodine. Cheers!

    Autism: transient in utero hypothyroxinemia related to maternal flavonoid ingestion during pregnancy and to other environmental antithyroid agents.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
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    Published Saturday, January 09, 2010 12:00 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/9/896.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    proclus : Michael L. Love: writing and riding

    Michael L. Love: writing and riding
    I have been busy writing. Some of it may appear here eventually. It is unclear to me that community members are interested in broader personal information, other than that which is focused on one of the four main interest categories. And I am inclined at this time to put such information elsewhere. Such is the case with the article I wrote today.

    Google, user interests, and biasing factors
    http://proclus.gnu-darwin.org/google-bias.html

    Data from the community blog post tables assisted my conclusions. That is how I spent my morning. There is more in the pipe, such as some autobiographical information. I am currently thinking that community members are less interested in topics that do not fall strictly under the four goal/interest categories. Which is the main reason I have been posting such material elsewhere. I think that this article is germane to anyone who wants to promote their blog, which many in the community might find helpful. It is like the code I developed for blog extraction, and I am posting to all four groups because of this fact.

    I split my bicycle rim this week, and I will likely spend the afternoon spoking it out. This problem is due to the magnesium, which is much softer than conventional bicycle materials. Other bicycles would be less expensive, more reliable, and stronger, as I describe in the winter bicycling articles. This is the disadvantage of riding in style, but I think that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. The light weight and attention-getting appearance are the main advantages of this ultra-light bicycle. The crucial action is that people see the bicyclist. In addition to promoting the sport, it is good for the continued health and well being of the rider, as well as the writer.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: blogging, facebook, and Radical Mormon
  • Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus
  • Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe
  • Michael L. Love: parsley recipe alert!
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    Published Saturday, February 27, 2010 02:27 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/27/1203.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    proclus : Michael L. Love: Tyrosol Lignins

    Michael L. Love: Tyrosol Lignins
    I would like to share my intitial impressions regarding tyrosol and lignins.  I finally got a chance to try a couple of products containing these substances, and I was able to do a little checking, including some blood pressure measurements.  I am borderline prehypertensive for various reasons, many of which are harmless, but I like to keep an eye on it.  It should be noted that these impressions are preliminary, empirical, and anecdotal.

    Lignins are a highly varied and often complex molecular species, so that it should always be inquired as to what type of lignans are being referred to.  I am convinced that lignan molecules can be expected to be at the frontier of longevity medicine.  It is no surprise that there is much excitement around these compounds, which have good free radical quenching capabilities, and similar structures to other polyphenolic compounds, which have been demonstrated to have enormously healthful benefits.

    Tyrosol is another molecule which shares in the same interesting properties as lignans in the general sense, and in fact, many lignans are based on tyrosol.  These include the lignins in flax and olive.  Tyrosol has been demonstrated to have similar beneficial qualities, but it is also deserving of certain caveats, as are the tyrosol lignan class in general.

    Tyrosol and tyrosol lignans are included in certain nasal and throat spray preparations, and it is not surprising that they exhibit a decongestant-like property, due to their similar structure to adenergic molecules, such as norepinephrine.  In fact, tyrosol has been demonstrated to have antiarrhythmic effects, which could be beneficial for some people.  This is consistent with alpha-1 adenergic activation, and explains the decongestant effect as well.

    At this juncture, I would like to remind that these are preliminary findings, and people should search out the matter in the literature for themselves.  My research is indicating at this time that alpha-1 activation is not beneficial from a longevity perspective, and is likely to cause harm to people with rapid heartbeat or high blood pressure.  One reason for this is the resulting Akt activation, which you can look up for yourself.  I try to avoid alpha-1 activation, which is a stress response.  For this reason, I have until now tried to avoid decongestant medicines, which are typically alpha-1 adenergics.

    Tyrosol shares its molecular properties with norepinephrin, the body’s native alpha-1 receptor ligand, and as such it can be expected that there are ameliorating factors which offset the problems.  Although, alpha-1 activation may lead to runaway calcium cascades, tyrosine kinase activation, and an increase in inflammatory factors, these effects which are often adverse are offset by the phenolic structure of the molecule, which may tend to scavange the resulting free radicals and produce some of the other benefits that are associated with polyphenols, like resveratrol.

    My advice at this time is to use discretion and moderation when supplementing with tyrosol and tyrosol lignins.  Consider the state of your health.  Personally, with borderline prehypertension, I will tend to use less than some other people.  For example, I will use the topical and intranasal preparations only as needed.  I have the flax oil with lignan fraction preparation from NSI, and I think that it could be beneficial, but due to these concerns, I will limit myself to an occasional 1/2 teaspoon.  I like it in my yogurt fruit smoothie, and it tastes better than olive oil in the juice.  Much more could obviously be said about olive oils.  Anyway, for people with low blood pressure and/or adverse congestion and swelling in the nasal epithelium, the effects may be more beneficial.

    Adenergics are frequently a part of body building regimens, and I would advice caution.  There are beta-adenergic agonists, which are probably more on target and effective than the alpha-1 agonists.  Moreover, they can be expected to be more heathful in the general sense as well.

    I am afraid that I am always eager to try the hottest new supplement, in order to expand my longevity program, and as a result, I do not always proceed with scientific rigor.  I find myself backpedalling from time to time, which is why I put the caveats on this piece.  I must confess that the observed effects could be due to a change in my vitamin E regimen, but I find that unlikely. 

    For the future, I think that tannins are in a similar preliminary state as lignins.  There are huge potential benefits, but an equal degree of concerns.  I hope that this information helps someone, and I will post updates as I learn more.

    Incidentally, for those concerned about high blood pressure, you might want to have a look at forskolin.  It is available in herbal extract form  from NSI.  I recommend a strict regimen when using forskolin, in order to avoid the rollercoaster effect.  It would probably be wise to consult with a healthcare professional about it.  I will probably have more to say about this later, as it is related to this story above.

    Finally,  I would like to boost another new idea.  I think that phenolics which are not alpha-1 adenergic would be a better addition to an intranasal spray.  It would not give users that familiar punch, but it would be more benefical in the long run.  There are many naturally occuring flavonoids, which are known to have beneficial antimicrobal activity, and it should not be difficult to find the best one, perhaps among the citrus variety.  In a suspension with a little citric acid to lower the pH and aid absorption, it could be quite beneficial and effective, without the alpha-1 body load… BTW, for the throat spray too.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols, first round results
  • Michael L. Love: Tryosol Lignins
  • Michael L. Love: Bisphenol Molecules Structural Archive and Gallery
  • Michael L. Love: Nano baby doll house music maker
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
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    Published Friday, January 01, 2010 07:06 PM by proclus

    Read More at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/1/849.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Michael L. Love: healthful easy fudge recipe

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    As has been noted previously in this blog, cocoa flavonoids share in the healthful benefits of other noted flavonoids, such as citrus bioflavonoids and parsley apigenin.  In fact, 70% dark chocolate has been widely recommended because of the demonstrated health benefit.

    I had suspected that most of the phenolics and other beneficial anti-oxidants were bound to the fiber in the cocoa solids, and like many other foods, such as grain and citrus, this turns out to be the case.  It is unfortunate that these beneficial substances have sometimes been set aside in the past, but thankfully, that is changing.  In the case of cocoa, this tends to be less of a problem, because the delicious chocolate flavor resides in the solid fraction, from which cocoa powder is made.  There is, however, some cause for concern, because harsh processing is often used to improve the flavor, and it is likely that much nutrient loss results from these processes.  This is why I favor plain, inexpensive, commonplace cocoa powder.  One of the reasons it is less expensive is that it has received less processing.  It should be noted that it is not too hard to find a whole pound of cocoa powder for the price of a single 70% dark chocolate bar, and the powder is likely just as beneficial.  You can even improve the healthfulness by adding more cocoa than is found in the chocolate bar without sacrificing flavor, as I explain below.

    I say, beware of chocolate that is too delicious, because you might be losing some of the benefit.  Similar to the problem of chocolate processing, the glycemic sweeteners that are used to improve the flavor can also detract from the healthful benefit, and the cocoa butter, though beneficial, is likely far less healthful than the cocoa powder.  In order to address these problems in this fudge recipe, no cocoa butter is used. That means using cocoa powder instead of chocolate.  Although it is not sugar free, agave nectar is non-glycemic, and it has been demonstrated to be healthful when used in moderation.  This is due in part to the fact that agave nectar is much sweeter than table sugar so that less is used.  Agave nectar also happens to make a very tasty suspension of the cocoa particles, fudge.  To me the taste is comparable to some more expensive 70% dark chocolates, and it is also likely just as beneficially healthful.  In fact, it is a delicious chocolate treat that can easily be adapted as a spreadable dessert topping.  If you are like me, you may have some difficulty maintaining the crucial portion restriction, because of that great old irresistible chocolate flavor.  Even with the healthful adaptations, it is still a classic.

    It is interesting to muse that our lust for chocolate derives directly from the fact that the polyphenolic and anti-oxidant power resides in the solid fraction, which preserves extremely well.  These phenolic and phenyamine molecules surely contribute to the neuroactivity of chocolate. These factors also likely explain the marvelous shelf life of cocoa butter, although it has far less of them.  It is truly an unusual case, and our taste for some other flavonoid-laden foods is apparently far less evolved.  Chocolate is wildly popular in many countries across the globe, and if it is well prepared, it is a very healthful food that kids love.  For those on diets, I have found that a regular helping of cocoa reduces cravings considerably, so that it can aid weight loss if portion restrictions are obeyed.  At any rate, on to the recipe.  It is very simple, easy, and inexpensive to make.  By my measure, it is about 80% cocoa, but you would not know it by the taste, because the agave nectar is very sweet. It is a chocolatey powerhouse!

    Makes 1 serving:
    2 heaping tbsp cocoa powder
    1 tbsp agave nectar

    optional:
    1 heaping tbsp peanut butter (I like chunky for the texture.)
    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    Carefully mix the ingredients until a dark, uniform mixture is achieved.  As anyone who works with cocoa powder will tell you, it will require a good amount of careful mixing to avoid waste and achieve a uniform mixture, but it is well worth the effort. ;-}  I have to say it is so delicious that I have never allowed it to set up very well, but I have some friends with more experience who assure me that it will, especially with the peanut butter added.  Without the cocoa butter and sugar, it may not have a classic fudge consistency, but for the additional healthful benefit, it is likely well worth this small sacrifice.  Trust me, sucrose molecules are worth avoiding.  Although I am changing over from chocolate to this recipe, I consider it to be still somewhat experimental, and I may post further adaptations here.  Feel free to suggest something, and we can discuss it.  For example, I find that without the peanut butter, it makes a delicious coating for a serving of nuts.

    In summary, this fudge delivers that classic taste, very much like good 70% dark chocolate, and it also provides even more of the healthful cocoa, with much less glycemic load, at far less monetary cost.  I think we have a winner here, but please remember to mind your portion restriction.  Too much of this stuff might destroy the benefit.

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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org

    The blog

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  • Why does any body want to live forever?
  • Michael L. Love/proclus/GNU-Darwin link block
  • Michael L. Love: addressing backlash pain
  • Michael L. Love: blog rss feed
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and autism
  • Michael L. Love: Sharing your blog
  • Michael L. Love Love's Japan
  • Michael L. Love: parsley brownie
  • Michael L. Love: My brother's blog: Certain Conditions
  • Michael L. Love: Thank you SourceForge and many others too!
  • Michael L. Love: Foundations
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    Posted Sunday, Apr 25, 2010 4:17 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues

    Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
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    I don’t know if I am the first person to eat a cup of parsley flakes every day.  I doubt it, but there are not many reports.  It is definitely a learning experience.  For example, my eyes are a little dry, certainly due the CFTR inhibition by apigenin.  It is only a little bothersome, and not severe.  I have never had dry eyes in my life, and it is an interesting experience.  I don’t plan to resort to an eye wash.  I may reduce my dose somewhat, but not yet, I am having too much fun.

    As noted below, this program easily puts gram levels of flavonoids into your body, and as a plus, you will enjoy the marvellous parsley flavor as never before.  Due to the high flavonoid content, there is a possible increased likelihood of intestinal blockage with prolonged use, again because of the CFTR blockade.  If you are like me, you will merely experience more regularity, but as noted before, those who might have intestinal problems, such as cryptitis, should probably not use this much parsley. 

    It is remarkable how widespread the effects of CFTR blockade are in the body.  My heartburn is much diminished since starting the parsley regimen, which would also be a consistent effect, since CFTR function is a key component of acid secretion in the stomach, as well as acid quenching in the duodenum.  In fact, this is a key reason why cystic fibrosis patients require special diets, and enzyme supplementation.  I would suspect that this is one reason why enzymes are so popular in the supplement community.

    Another thing that I am noticing is a prolonged and enhanced effect of dextromorphan.  This is confirmational of the finding that apigenin, like several other flavoniods, inhibits a p450 enzyme that is involved in dextromorphan metabolism, among several other drugs.  A reduced dose may be indicated, and I will be getting my scheduled liver and kidney tests promptly.  My experience is that this enhanced effect is profound, and my coughing symptoms have improved vastly.  It should be noted at this point that this much parsley is quite diuretic as well. 

    These effects are not limited to parsley or apigenin, and there are quite a few polyphenols that are capable of producing a CFTR blockade, notably resveratrol.  If you get very far above gram level dosing, you are also likely to experience similar effects with quercetin.  The same is true for the p450 inhibition.

    I am learning more about the parsley plant.  For example, the root and seeds have much more of the other interesting parsley molecule, apiol, also known as parsley extract, parsley oil, or parsley camphor.  There is much to say about apiol, but I will only give it a cursory treatment.  There is much information about this molecule elsewhere on the web.  The apiol extract is an anciently known preparation with many uses, including regularization of menstruation and an abortitive property.  It is also somewhat dangerous, and there are even reported fatalities from ingesting too much apiol.  Perhaps some young women, eager to restore their menstruation, unfortunately abused this chemical in the camphor form.

    Apiol can have other unhealthful effects, and it has even been demonstrated to form DNA adducts, due to its extended reactive end-group.  This is a commonplace problem associated with the 1-allyl side chain, which is found in many flavonoid producing plants.  Unlike some other compounds, apiol forms weak adducts, which are apparently easily rectified in the cell, and there is much less apiol in the leaves, which is unlikely to present a problem.

    I would be interested in hearing if any women are experiencing regularization of menstruation while on this parsley regimen.  The effect may be small to nil, due to the comparitively low apiol content of the parsley flakes.

    Well, this turned out to be rather exhuastive after all.  Cheers!

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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

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  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols, first round results
  • Michael L. Love: Tryosol Lignins
  • Michael L. Love: Bisphenol Molecules Structural Archive and Gallery
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  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
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    Published Monday, January 25, 2010 08:42 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/25/1052.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    proclus : Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides

    Michael L. Love: proclus molecules blog
    Welcome to Michael L. Love on Vitacost!

    Probably my most recognizable feature is that I don’t own a car, and I bicycle for exercise twice most days.

    email:proclus@gnu-darwin.org

    Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
    How might apigenin chloride channel blockade decrease serum triglycerides?  In other words, could one reduce serum triglycerides by eating parsley?  What follows is abit speculative, and I will admit that I have not yet researched the topic fully in the literature.  More will follow.  If you are comfortable with the fact the following may contain inaccurate extrapolations, the proceed.

    The first thing to observe is that a decrease in serum triglycerides would be a paradoxical effect.  The channel blockade agents that are being considered here are also COX inhibitors and COX expression inhibitors, so that at low dose they can be expected to raise serum triglycerides, as observed.

    At high dose, the agents would tend to raise the hydrostatic pressure of the cell, by blocking one of the primary means of reducing that pressure, the CFTR chloride channels.  The physical model indicates, that increased hydrostatic pressure may lead to increased inward vesicular transport, and reduce serum triglycerides.  The mechanism is unknown to me at this time.

    Some things about the pathway and mechanism are known to me, for example, COX inhibitors would tend to raise serum triglycerides, because the product of the COX reaction, prostaglandins, binds to PPAR alpha and activates inward vesicular transport, probably by some genetic mechanism.  It should be noted that prostaglandin production is the direct result of the activity of phospholipase, which provides the COX reagents.

    One could hypothesize that a cellular response to CFTR blockade combined with COX inhibition would be the release of agents which activate phospholipase activity, such as histamine and norepinephrine.  By doing this, the cell would be attempting to make more COX reagents, so that the inward vesicular transport can be turned on, perhaps in order to avoid hydrostatic rupture.

    Hydrostatic rupture is probably an over-statement, and what we are discussing are more like tendencies, rather than requirements.  One observation in support of this argument would be that cAMP-activated CFTR chloride permeabiltiy is able to overcome the blockade to varying degrees.  The blockade is unlikely to be complete under cAMP-activated conditions.  In fact, in cells which express cAMP coupled receptors, such as the beta-adenergic receptors, extra-cellular ligands to these receptors can be expected to alleviate hydrostatic pressure, without recourse to vesicular transport.  Moreover, the cell likely has other means of releasing solutes to draw out water.  For example, there is another important chloride channel, which may play a key role.  More on that later.

    Two of the ligands which can activate both phospholipase and cAMP production are histamine and adenergics, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine, and cellular secretion of these products would be expected to help relieve hydrostatic pressure, by activating both CFTR, and inward vesicular transport, even during CFTR blockade which tends to be partial.  This cellular response may take time to come to full fruition, perhaps days or weeks.

    It should be noted that alpha-1 and H1 activation leading to phospholipase activity is the very stress response that we are trying to avoid.  Phospholipase activity is associated with many problems, being implicated in cancer for example, and one infers that phospholipase activators would have the same association.

    My experience is consistent with adenergic activation resulting from CFTR blockade, but I will need another week or so to eliminate some extraneous factors.  Such activation would also be consistent with some of the puzzling and unexpectedly elevated blood pressure readings that I have had transiently in recent days.

    Are blockading levels of resveratrol or flavonoids beneficial in the overall sense?  My parsley experience clearly rings a cautionary note, but the animal experiments are indicating that a higher dose is consistent with deeper CR memesis, and that it is more healthfully beneficial than a lower dose.  Perhaps the explanation for this observation resides in the intestine, resulting from CFTR blockade, but it may also result from a greater increase in triglyceride transport, especially inward transport.  I am anxiously awaiting my next blood triglyceride assay.  I would also add that increasing water intake is recommended for the parsley regimen in order to compensate for the diminished mucous secretion, among other things.  

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    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Published Friday, January 29, 2010 01:23 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/29/1065.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    proclus : Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe

    Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe
    I have added some refinements to my citrus pudding recipe, so that it is now a tastey classic pudding, which can be used as a pie stuffer, or even baked into a pleasant loaf.  It includes my trademark 1/2 cup parsley.

    1/2 cup parsley flakes
    1 medium to large citrus fruit
    1 heaping teaspoon flax powder or nopalina
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon flax or olive oil
    1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper.
    2 tablespoons berry juice concentrate
    1 large heaping tablespoonful of plain yogurt
    1 large heaping tablespoonful peanut butter, or a small handful of nuts
    1 bilberry teabag
    1 Pau D’arco teabag

    Mash ingredients together until well mixed.  For pudding, microwave for 5.5 minutes on high.  For bread, cook longer.  Try mashing in some fresh fruit too, such as 1/2 cup of black grapes.  Add a teaspoon of agave nectar, if you want it sweeter, but the mild tart flavor is pleasant and important for quenching the black pepper, which is a crucial part of the nutrient absorption regimen.  This is definitely a citrus pudding, so don’t substitute out the citrus.

    I really enjoy getting my citrus and parsley this way on the weekends and snow days.  Hope that you do too!

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    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

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  • Michael L. Love: parsley recipe alert!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and bone loss
  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
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    Published Sunday, February 21, 2010 08:36 AM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/21/1162.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters

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    Diarrhea is a frequently problem for those who undertake supplementation and vegetarian-style regimens.  On the other hand, what for some of us is a minor inconvenience or annoyance can become life-threatening in some parts of the world where there are complicating issues.  It is a real problem, which is larger than some of us think, and the dehydration resulting from diarrhea may be dangerous for those who are using supplements as well.  First advice is drink plenty of water if you are using supplements.  It should be noted that water shock can be fatal in severe cases.

    As it happens, certain flavonoids have been documented to have a paradoxical anti-diarrhea property when taken in large doses.  This is due to inhibition of the ATP-cAMP-dependent chloride channel (CFTR), and these flavonoids have been suggested as a remedy in cases where diarrhea might become dangerous.  Parsley flavonoid shares in the ability to block this channel and slow digestion, so that water can be absorbed from the intestine.

    Fortunately, parsley is a widely available commodity, even in some of the poorest of countries.   I am recommending that an anti-diarrhea emulsion could include enough parsley to help save lives.  It has been demonstrated that such inexpensive preparations can do great good.  It can be flavored with a little sweetener for small children.  Diarrhea can take its toll, particularly on the young, hopefully this information will help to prevent the death of some little ones.

    Interestingly, the cystic fibrosis disease results from a defect in this same chloride channel.  The wide range of symptoms indicate how widespread this channel is in the body, including the nasal passages and lungs.  Those suffering from intestinal maladies, such as cryptitis, should consider avoiding such things as quercetin and parsley flakes.  There is some evidence that we can find alternative flavonoid regimens for them, which do not inhibit the channel.   I am including below a salient reference.

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    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Cocoa-related flavonoids inhibit CFTR-mediated chloride transport across T84 human colon epithelia

    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz

    Published Monday, January 18, 2010 08:36 PM by proclus

    proclus : Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus, more parsley caveats

    Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus
    Now that I have been high dosing flavonoids for a few weeks, I think that it may be time for another change.  My stomach acid and digestion have apparently returned to what they were before I started,

    Read more at the Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/22/1167.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/